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Sink, Lakey, Bowman win

New blood for Wilkes County Board of Commissioners

By JERRY LANKFORD
Record Editor

Sink Charles Sink, Arnold Lakey and Tom Bowman were the top three candidates in Tuesday’s Wilkes County Commissioners’ race. Sink, a Republican, took the top spot with 15,311 votes. Lakey, a Democrat, brought in the next highest amount with 12,569 votes. Both will serve four-year terms. Both are political newcomers. Bowman, a former county commissioner, collected 12,445 votes. He will serve a two-year term on the board. “I was pleased,” Bowman said. “I’m glad to be one of the three.” Incumbent commissioner Jack Welborn, a Republican, got 12,066 votes. Democrats Joe Anthony, 7,977 votes, and Michael Brinegar, 7,427 votes, rounded out the six-candidate field. Sink, who had waited for results with about 20 others in the Wilkes County Office Building, said, “I’m excited. I said in the primary that I had a lot of help behind me. I’m pleased and proud with how we did.” About the campaign, Sink said, “It’s been overwhelming at the support I’ve got. It’s just hard to express. But, it’s pretty demanding, I wouldn’t want to do this all the time.” As he waited, Sink said, “I feel confident that I’ve done well. I’m appreciative of the people who have helped me.” In the presidential race Republican George Bush took 16,748 votes in Wilkes compared to Democrat Al Gore’s 7,195. Republican gubernatorial candidate Richard Vinroot collected 14,347 Wilkes votes to Democrat Mike Easley’s 9,969 votes. Final results of national and statewide races were not available by 11 p.m. Tuesday. Local results were slow in coming Tuesday night. Wilkes Elections Director Keith Erwin said there had been problems with “red stripe” ballots (ballots that had been rejected by voting machines). Lakey

Bowman At 9:25 p.m. 11 precincts’ rejected ballots had not been counted. Election officials had sent voting numbers from the 29 precincts by computer modem. Despite the delay in results, Erwin said, “We’re pleased with the modems.” Results were released around 10:30 p.m. Many of those waiting for the outcome grumbled. “I bet they don’t do it this way again,” one man said. Around 7:15 p.m. precinct workers at the North Wilkesboro Fire Department were seeing a hectic day come to a close. When asked if they had been busy, precinct worker Cathy Wyatt, said, “That’s an understatement.” Outside political signs decorated a 25-mph speed limit sign like a totem pole. Tracy Walker candidate for the 41st State House District, stood outside the Wilkesboro Civic Center as the polls closed. Walker who is running unopposed said, “I feel good.”

Animal Control charges dog owner

By JERRY LANKFORD
Record Editor

       Wilkes County Animal Control officials took action against a man, whose neighbors say won't keep his dangerous dogs restrained. Brian Webber, of Congo Road, is facing criminal charges in connection with a violation of the county's animal ordinance. Papers were "taken out" on Webber last Tuesday afternoon after Wilkes Animal Control officials were contacted by The Record. As of Monday, Webber had not been served with the papers, said Wilkes Animal Control Supervisor Junior Simmons. The charge came after complaints by neighbors. They said that Webber's dogs, a pair of Akitas, had repeatedly attacked their dogs. Last week, Simmons said Wilkes Animal Control officers checked to see if the dogs were still on Webber's property. He said that Webber had said they would be removed. "The dogs were still there," Simmons said. Last Tuesday afternoon, officials drew the charges at the Wilkes County Magistrate's office, he said. A court date is set for Dec. 8. Simmons said the charge is based on a section of the ordinance that forbids pet owners to allow their animals "to run at large." He said the ordinance states that an owner must restrain an animal "by means of a chain, leash, or other similar device." The ordinance also considers an animal restrained if the owner is near the animal, if the animal is on its owner's property or if the animal is in a vehicle with the owner. "If your dog will stay inside your property, you can leave it outside," Simmons said. Webber told The Record on Monday that he has kept his dogs on cable runs inside a wooden fence. "I regret anything has happened," he said. "I fixed the gates over and over." Webber said that other dogs in the neighborhood roam freely. He originally had one dog until a neighbor's animal impregnated his dog, he said. "The whole thing is unfortunate," Webber said, adding that he plans to move out of Wilkes County at the end of the week and take his dogs with him. "At this point, I don't know what else I can do," he said.

       Webber has been to court at least two other times (once in 1998 and again last year) in connection with his dogs, Simmons said. Those court cases resulted in Webber paying fines to the county and veterinarian bills of owners of injured dogs. Sandra Wilmoth, who lives two doors down from Webber, said her poodle and chow have been attacked several times by the Akitas. Wilmoth's daughter, Lisa Church, said the most recent attacks came on Oct. 18. That day, she said, she had taken her mother to the doctor. When she returned, the women saw blood on the wooden porch. Church added that she believes the Akitas killed her Pomeranian last spring. When told of the charges against Webber, she seemed pleased. "I'm glad they're doing something," she said. Simmons said a conviction of the charge is a Class 3 misdemeanor. A judge determines punishment and fines, he said.

Wrongdoing alleged in cat deaths

By JERRY LANKFORD
Record Editor

Charlotte Porter says she's been on the phone with county officials since two of her cats were killed at the Wilkes Animal Shelter.                                               Record photo - Lankford        A Wilkesboro businesswoman says two of her cats were picked up and killed by Wilkes County Animal Control officers before she had a chance to retrieve them. Charlotte Porter, manager of Hollywood Weight Loss Centre on Main Street in Wilkesboro, said the cats were killed shortly after they were taken to the pound. She claims that the ac-tion was vindictive because of previous problems with animal control. "I have been done a grave injustice," Porter said during a Monday interview with The Record. "My cats are dead and I'll never get them back." Porter, who helped found the Wilkes County Humane Society in 1989, is known locally for her humanitarian work with animals. She said she plans to send letters to each Wilkes County commissioner outlining the problems she has had with Animal Control. Wilkes Animal Control officers had picked up three of Porter's cats in October. Two of the cats had been trapped in cages on Oct. 31 and were killed shortly after they were taken to the animal shelter, she said. Porter had retrieved one cat earlier in the month, she said. She added that she received no notification that the other two animals, a black and a gray cat taken on Halloween, had been picked up. When she noticed the animals were missing, Porter said she repeatedly called the pound to see if the animals were there. She said she was told the cats were not there. "They lied to me," she said. Porter said her problem with Wilkes Animal Control started several weeks ago when she attempted to get the department to investigate a report of abused and neglected dogs. During that conversation, Porter said she spoke with Wilkes Animal Control Supervisor Junior Simmons. Porter, whose home is located near her business between a town and a county parking lot, said that Simmons told her there had been complaints about her cats walking on cars. She said that Simmons then threatened to pick up all her cats.

       The conversation turned into an argument, Porter said. She believes that's why Simmons wanted to "get my cats." Simmons denied the allegations during a Monday afternoon interview with The Record. When asked if he threatened Porter's cats, Simmons said, "No sir. Not in any way." Porter said that cages, baited with canned cat food, had been placed near her residence. Simmons said he wasn't aware that the cages had been put out because he was out of town in training classes. He said the cages were placed after his department received complaints about cats from a nearby florist. Porter said that she went to the animal shelter on Saturday to look for her cats. They weren't there. Animal Control Officer Greg Blevins, who picked up the cats, had told Porter that the cats had been "put down," Porter said. Most animals are kept at the shelter for 72 hours after they are picked up, Simmons said. Wild cats and dogs are euthanized a short time after their arrival. Porter said shelter staff members told her that the cats, fitting the description of those she owned, had acted wild. "He (Blevins) said that the staff decided that the cats were unadopt-able." But, Porter said, the cats were tame. "They were frightened by being there," she said. Simmons said it's not clear if the cats, which were euthanized, were actually Porter's. "These cats were wild," he said. "She said hers were tame." Many dogs and cats come to the shelter, Simmons said. "We pick up around 6,000 animals a year," he said. He added that in October his officers picked up 38 gray cats, 32 black and white cats and 37 black cats, which makes it harder to determine whether the euthanatized animals belonged to Porter. Simmons said that the animal control ordinance states that pet owners are responsible for keeping their animals on their property. Porter said that her animals either stay in her house or in her backyard. "They were baited with the canned cat food," she said. She added that she has had several phone conversations with Simmons and County Manager Gary Page since her cats disappeared. She said her inquiries were met with disrespectful tones. "They need to remember that I'm a taxpayer and that I pay their salaries," she said. Page said he has heard both sides of the story. "I don't think there has been any intentional wrongdoing," he said. "I think there might have been some miscommunication." Porter said she doesn't blame Blevins, although she said he was the officer that took her cats. "Junior (Simmons) is over it. He's supposed to know what's going on." Other pet owners have heard about Porter's cats.

       Jessie Smith, Porter's friend, told The Record she is worried about the allegations against Animal Control. "I just don't like what's happening," Smith said. "How long is it going to be before this happens to somebody else?" Page said a national Dalmatian placement organization became upset with Wilkes Animal Control when a dog was euthanatized before the 72-hour holding period about six months ago. "The dog had kennel cough (a contagious dog disease) and we were afraid other animals would get sick." Lynn Kennelly, a member of the Wilkes Humane Society Board of Directors, said, "In general, the Humane Society has a very good working relationship with Junior (Simmons) and the rest of the staff at the shelter. We don't always like everything we see, but we realize they have a difficult job and do a real good job with what they have." Porter says that's not the case in her situation. "They knew this was going to happen," she said. "They meant for it to happen."

Fingerpickers a unique breed

By JERRY LANKFORD
Record Editor

Clay Lunsford shows his flashy guitar style.           Record photo- Lankford        It takes two handfuls of fingers to play two songs simultaneously on a guitar. Clay Lunsford can do it. Lunsford is one of the seemingly growing breed of fingerpickers. Interest in the style is growing across the state, he said. From that interest, Lunsford helped found the North Carolina Thumb and Finger Style Guitar Players Association. This weekend the 2-year-old organization will hold its second convention in Statesville. "We have the Chet Atkins Festival each year in Nashville. I felt like it would be good to have something like that in North Carolina where thumbpickers could come," Lunsford said. The convention will be held Friday and Saturday at the Holiday Inn in Statesville. Some of the better-known players scheduled to be there will include Buster B. Jones, Bob Saxton, Pat Kirtley and Thom Bresh, son of legendary thumbpicker Merle Travis. Several Wilkes fingerpickers, including Mike Palmer, a member of the association, plan to attend the event. The thumb and finger style of playing creates a full, melodic brand of music. Lunsford and Palmer demonstrated it one recent morning at Minton Pawn & Music. Palmer shook his head and grinned as Lunsford plucked out some tricky licks. "He's good," Palmer said. Lunsford, a Union Grove native, said he's been playing guitar for 35 years and is a member of Gospel Voices, a spiritual music group. Growing up in northern Iredell County, Lunsford found his preferred musical taste by listening to Merle Travis and Chet Atkins on the radio. A large family of musicians also sur-rounded him.

       His grandfather, Bascom Lamas Lunsford traveled through the Appalachian Mountains selling apples and collecting songs from the hill folk. Dee Williams, an Iredell sawmill and farm worker, was a major influence on Lunsford's playing style. He told how the man lost use of some fingers to injuries, but never allowed it to affect his music. "He was one of the great thumpickers," Lunsford said. Mastering the style, considered complex to some players, took years. "I would stay up all night sometimes working on it," he said. One challenge was to learn to separate the down-stroke of the thumb with the upward plucking of the other fingers. Lunsford showed what he meant. Playing "Yankee Doodle Dixie," his thumb picked out the melody line of "Yankee Doodle" while his index, middle and ring fingers played "Dixie." There will likely be a lot of that type of playing at this weekend's convention, Lunsford said. "We're not looking for financial gain or anything," he said. "We just want to cultivate the art form." Registration for the convention starts at noon Friday. Fees are $20. Membership in the association is $15 per year. For more information, call Lunsford president at 704-592-5981.

      

New petition rallies against incorporation efforts
Opposition to town grows

By JERRY LANKFORD
Record Editor

BURL LANKFORD        Opponents to the incorporation of areas of Millers Creek and Cricket have organized and are circulating their own petition. The message was clear from a crowd of more than 50 during a meeting last Thursday night at Vannoy & Lankford Plumbing on Suncrest Orchard Road. Businessman Burl Lankford, 67, spoke to the crowd in his company's warehouse. During the meeting he was elected president of the incorporation opposition. "This crowd of people don't want to be part of anybody's town, right?" Lankford asked. "Right," the crowd answered back and applauded. On Monday, Lankford said he wasn't sure how many signatures his side had gathered. He said, however, that 28 individuals were circulating the petition. Without the opposition, Lankford said that incorporation leaders could have had the proposal passed by the General Assembly without holding a local referendum. With copies of the pro-incorporation petition being verified to be presented to legislators later this month, "We're just in the nick of time," Lankford said during an interview with The Record on Monday. Harrold Bowlin, one of the leaders of the incorporation effort, had little to say about the opposition. "We don't have any comments on what any other group is doing," Bowlin said Monday. Bowlin added that he didn't want to release any new information until a meeting, scheduled for Thursday at 7 p.m. at the West Wilkes High School cafeteria. Many of those who attended last week's meeting left with the counter-petition in their hands. The group will meet again in the warehouse on Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. Lankford, who is also president of the Cricket/Millers Creek Water Association, began organizing against incorporation efforts after proponents met with the association board last month. They had asked the board for it's blessing in forming a new town. Lankford said no. "I'd been wondering all along how I'd get some opposition started to this," Lankford said. "It would be a great waste of money." Proponents for incorporation had estimated that they had collected nearly 4,000 signatures of support. Wilkes Elections Director Keith Erwin said on Monday that there were a total of 2,706 residents who had signed the petition. Only 1,830 signatures are valid, however, because 876 residents had printed their names.

       There had been a question whether the printed names could be counted. Erwin said that state Board of Elections officials said on Monday that the printed names were not legitimate signatures for a petition. Wilkes Commissioner Joe Woodie, a Millers Creek resident, stood at the front of the room with Lankford. Woodie told residents they could check with county officials if they had questions about the proposed incorporation or how to have their names removed from the original petition. He said that anyone wanting to remove their names from the petition favoring incorporation would have to do so at the Wilkes Board of Elections offices. Erwin said that several names have already been taken off that list. Incorporation proponents have said the proposed town would likely have a 5-cents per $100 valuation property tax rate. Lankford said there are hidden costs. Incorporation would mean an increase in county taxes by about 2 cents because of the lost sales tax revenue, which would go to the new town. Efforts to incorporate parts of the western Wilkes County communities began after North Wilkesboro began a sewer line extension project from town limits to the intersection of Old U.S. 421 and N.C. 16 in Millers Creek. During the course of the project, which began in March, Canterbury Estates became a satellite annexation of North Wilkesboro. According to state law, a town cannot satellite annex areas exceeding 10 percent in acres of the contiguous town boundaries, state officials say. Canterbury Estates puts North Wilkes-boro near its limit. Some residents attending last week's meeting said incorporation proponents have "lied" about their intentions. "They've been out using Democratic Al Gore scare tactics," said North Wilkesboro Mayor Pro Tem Steve Foster, the board's lone Republican. "We need to tell the truth. I can't say that one day (annexation) won't come up, but it's not in the foreseeable future." Foster added, "We need to tell people the whole truth. Incorporation would up county taxes a couple of cents." The proposed tax rate of the proposed town is inadequate to provide services, Foster said. "With 5 cents you can't build sewer lines," he said. "If you live on Old 421, you're alright. If not, you won't be able to do anything as far as sewer unless there is grant money available." Incorporation leaders' main argument is that North Wilkesboro plans to annex. Foster said it isn't true. "Don't tell people the evil empire is on the way, because we're not." He added, "I will always do what's right for the town, regardless of public opinion. That's why I was elected. Going out and antagonizing the rest of the county is not why I was put in there."
(Record Correspondent Megan Riley contributed to this report.)

The Wilkes County Public Library Chess Club meets every Saturday from noon to 3:00 p.m. in the Friends of the Library’s Meeting Room. If you are interested in a good game of chess and meeting other players from this area, stop by for an hour or two. Chess boards will be provided, and the club is free and open to all levels of players. The Nov. 4 and 11 meetings will meet from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. All other dates and times will remain the same.

Wilkes Central Class of 1991 is planning a class reunion. Anyone interested in helping to locate classmates and plan the reunion please contact Margaret Millsaps. Email millsaps@dasia.net or day phone 704-395-2661.

Wilkesboro United Methodist Church Busy Hands Group will hold their annual fall and Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 4 in the church fellowship hall from 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. Handmade crafts, baked goods, Brunswick stew (to go), hot dogs (come for lunch), and much more. Located at 309 West Main Street, Wilkesboro. No admission fee, everyone welcome.

WCHS Class of 1965 reunion scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 25th at North Wilkesboro Elks Club. Please contact Marcia Little 667-3095, or mblittle99@aol.com for more information. Looking for addresses to these classmates: Bobby P. Jones, Jewel Hayes Sheppard, Diane Eller, Mary Ellis Jennings, Flora Souther Johnson, Betty Church Higgins, Betty Souther Adams, Brenda Jenkins Maynard, Carolyn Brown, Daisy Adams, Peggy Adams Baker, Duane Allen, Judy K. Anderson Prevette, Judy Andrews Burris, Larry Cooper, Dicky Grayson, Alberta Greene, Barbara Jennings Osborne, Jerry Jennings, Arville Johnson, Linda Minton Johnson, Robert Minton, Margie Pardue Walsh, Larry Prevette, Ralph Teague, Dorothy Teague Church, and Larry Wagoner.

Wilkes Central High School Class of 1980 is looking for addresses of classmates for reunion which will be held on Saturday, Oct. 21 from 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. at the Elk’s Club. For more information on the reunion, check out our website at http://wchs1980 reunion.evisionsite.com or e-mail reunionwchs1980@evisional.com or call 838-7679 (Tammy Goff Love).

Turn over a new leaf...The Wilkes County Health Department is a participant in North Carolina’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program. If you are a woman 50-60 years old, have a little or no health insurance and meet certain household income guidelines, you may qualify for free testing for breast and cervical cancer. Take care of yourself by taking advantage of this wonderful program. To find out if you qualify, please call Wilkes County Health Department at 651-7524.

WCC Theatre presents "Annie." Performances will be Oct. 26, 27 and 28 at 7 p.m. Matinee performances will be Oct. 21, 22, 28, and 29 at 2 p.m. at the Theatre in Thompson Hall. Tickets may be purchased at WCC Visitor’s Center 838-6260. For additional information, call 838-6231.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. You wouldn’t hesitate to call if you saw flames coming from the house next door... If you or someone you know is being abused call 838-SAFE or 667-7656 for free help. This ad is sponsored by SAFE, Inc., a United Way Agency.

Are you or is anyone you know a Battered Woman? No matter where you live, free and confidential help for you and your children is just a phone call away. Local domestic violence programs can offer you: safety, shelter, counseling, support, court advocacy and other services. For immediate assistance call: SAFE, Inc. 838-SAFE or 667-7656. You are not alone. Sponsored by SAFE, Inc., a United Way Agency.

Let them hear your voice... What are the major concerns and issues facing women in your county? On Monday, November 13, you will have the opportunity to voice your opinions on issues that women face everyday. Some of these issues will include: access to healthcare, violence against women, clean elections, economic self-efficiency, pay equality, civil rights, adolescent pregnancy prevention, child care, economic development, living wage, aging and hate crimes. Please join us from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. at Wilkes Community College in Thompson Hall, Room 209. Co-sponsored by: SAFE, Inc. a United Way Agency and NC Equity. For more information please call Kina Gilley Crumpton at 838-9169.

T.O.P.S. take off pounds sensibly. Join us every Monday at 5 p.m. at St. John’s Church located on C.C. Wright School Road. For more information call 696-2442 or 696-4874.

All Veterans are invited to a Veterans Appreciation Day program, Saturday, November 11 at 4 p.m. at the old East Wilkes High School gym in Ronda. Willis Overby, a retired lieutenant colonel of the U.S. Army, Stokes County commissioner and retired school teacher and administrator, will be the featured speaker. Each Veteran will receive special recognition by branch of service and a certificate of appreciation. Door prizes will be given. Refreshments and finger foods will be served. The free event is sponsored by the Ruritan clubs of Benham, Clingman, Pleasant Ridge and Roaring River.

"Choices for the 21st Century," a public policy discussion series, will be held at the Wilkes County Public Library Friends of the Library Meeting Room on Saturdays: November 4 and 11, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. If you are interested in foreign policy for the United States in the 21st century, then please register for this series, contact James Ruszczyk, Adult Services Librarian, 838-2818, or email at jruszczyk@ncsl.dcr. state.nc.us.

The Wilkes County Public Library Book Club will next meet on Tuesday, November 21 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. This is a great book for all ages and will be a fun discussion for the last meeting of the year for the Book Club. Anyone interested in attending, please do. Call 838-2818 for more information.

"Echoes of the Blue Ridge," a musical journey hosted by Steve and Penny Kilby will be performed on Tuesday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the Friends of the Library Meeting Room at the Wilkes County Public Library. The music of the Southern Appalachians has a long and rich history. Let Steve and Penny share this heritage with you through a unique program of words and music. For more information, contact the Reference Department at 838-2818.

Roaring River Elementary School’s Fall Festival will be Friday, November 3 from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Special fun events for everyone. Please come.

The Wilkes County Public Library Chess Club meets every Saturday from noon to 3:00 p.m. in the Friends of the Library’s Meeting Room. If you are interested in a good game of chess and meeting other players from this area, stop by for an hour or two. Chess boards will be provided, and the club is free and open to all levels of  players. The Nov. 11 meeting will meet from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. All other dates and times will remain the same.

 

WCHS Class of 1965 reunion scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 25th at North Wilkesboro Elks Club. Please contact Marcia Little 667-3095, or mblittle99@aol.com for more information. Looking for addresses to these classmates: Bobby P. Jones, Jewel Hayes Sheppard, Diane Eller, Mary Ellis Jennings, Flora Souther Johnson, Betty Church Higgins, Betty Souther Adams, Brenda Jenkins Maynard, Carolyn Brown, Daisy Adams, Peggy Adams Baker, Duane Allen, Judy K. Anderson Prevette, Judy Andrews Burris, Larry Cooper, Dicky Grayson, Alberta Greene, Barbara Jennings Osborne, Jerry Jennings, Arville Johnson, Linda Minton Johnson, Robert Minton, Margie Pardue Walsh, Larry Prevette, Ralph Teague, Dorothy Teague Church, and Larry Wagoner.

 

Turn over a new leaf...The Wilkes County Health Department is a participant in North Carolina’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program. If you are a woman 50-60 years old, have a little or no health insurance and meet certain household income guidelines, you may qualify for free testing for breast and cervical cancer. Take care of yourself by taking advantage of this wonderful program. To find out if you qualify, please call Wilkes County Health Department at 651-7524.

 

Let them hear your voice... What are the major concerns and issues facing women in your county? On Monday, November 13, you will have the opportunity to voice your opinions on issues that women face everyday. Some of these issues will include: access to healthcare, violence against women, clean elections, economic self-efficiency, pay equality, civil rights, adolescent pregnancy prevention, child care, economic development, living wage, aging and hate crimes. Please join us from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. at Wilkes Community College in Thompson Hall, Room 209. Co-sponsored by: SAFE, Inc. a United Way Agency and NC Equity. For more information please call Kina Gilley Crumpton at 838-9169.

 

T.O.P.S. take off pounds sensibly. Join us every Monday at 5 p.m. at St. John’s Church located on C.C. Wright School Road. For more information call 696-2442 or 696-4874.

 

All Veterans are invited to a Veterans Appreciation Day program, Saturday, November 11 at 4 p.m. at the old East Wilkes High School gym in Ronda. Willis Overby, a retired lieutenant colonel of the U.S. Army, Stokes County commissioner and retired school teacher and administrator, will be the featured speaker. Each Veteran will receive special recognition by branch of service and a certificate of appreciation. Door prizes will be given. Refreshments and finger foods will be served. The free event is sponsored by the Ruritan clubs of Benham, Clingman, Pleasant Ridge and Roaring River.

 

“Choices for the 21st Century,” the last of the public policy discussion series, will be held at the Wilkes County Public Library Friends of the Library Meeting Room on Saturday, November 11, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. If you are interested in foreign policy for the United States in the 21st century, then please register for this series, contact James Ruszczyk, Adult Services Librarian, 838-2818, or email at jruszczyk@ncsl.dcr.state.nc.us.

 

The Wilkes County Public Library Book Club will next meet on Tuesday, November 21 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. This is a great book for all ages and will be a fun discussion for the last meeting of the year for the Book Club. Anyone interested in attending, please do. Call 838-2818 for more information.

 

“Echoes of the Blue Ridge,” a musical journey hosted by Steve and Penny Kilby will be performed on Tuesday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the Friends of the Library Meeting Room at the Wilkes County Public Library. The music of the Southern Appalachians has a long and rich history. Let Steve and Penny share this heritage with you through a unique program of words and music. For more information, contact the Reference Department at 838-2818.

 

Homecoming - November 12 at Shew Ridge Mission, 11 a.m. service. Special singing group will be From The Heart. Dinner will follow the service.

 

Revival will be at Chestnut Grove Independent Baptist Church on Hwy 18N, Mertie Road, November 8, 9 and 10. Services start at 7 p.m. each night. Brother Jerry Adams will be guest speaker.

 

The Wilkes County Cooperative Extension Service and the Extension and Community Association is sponsoring a bus tour to the Southern Christmas Show in Charlotte on Tuesday, November 14. The bus will leave Goody’s parking lot on Hwy. 421 at 8:30 a.m. and return around 6 p.m. Cost of the tour is $23 per person and includes bus transportation and show ticket. There will be a dinner stop in Statesville on the way back. The Christmas Show runs from November 9 through November 19. Advance discount tickets are also available for any day of the show for anyone not wishing to ride the bus. If you would like to reserve a seat on the bus or reserve an advance ticket, please call the Wilkes County Center of the Cooperative Extension Service at 651-7330.

 

Sewing Class, “Color Me Happy” Snowmen Vest - Madra Prater, our resident authority on sewing methods, will be teaching probably her last local sewing class. The class will be on Wednesday, November 15 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the County Office Building, Room 307, Wilkesboro. Learn an easy new technique. You must pay for the class by November 10. You will receive a supply list when you pay for the class. Cost for the class is $14. Don’t miss out on this wonderful opportunity to take a class with the master, Madra Prater.

 

Blowing Rock Jazz Society presents a night of jazz with Todd Wright and the Appalachian State University Jazz Department Sunday, November 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the Artist’s Palate Restaurant (located in the Meadowbrook Inn), 711 Main Street, Blowing Rock. Tickets are $4 for students and $10 for adults. Proceeds to benefit the Future Scholarship Fund. For more information, please call: Fred German (828) 265-3242 or Todd Wright (828) 264-6860.

 

On November 16, Roger Reynolds from WATA/WZJS is going to “Take A Seat!” Actually about 8,500 seats. In celebration of the long anticipated opening of the George M. Holmes Convocation Center, Roger Reynolds will sit in every seat of the ASU Mountaineer’s new home. Pledges will be taken for every seat or a set amount can be donated. All proceeds will go to the Yosef Club for scholarships. To pledge, call the Yosef Club at (828) 262-5200 or WATA/WZJS at  (828) 264-2411.

 

Communities In Schools will have a short Lunch Buddies volunteer training session on Friday, November 17 at 12 noon. The next training date for Lunch Buddies will be on the 28th at 12 noon for those who cannot attend on the 17th. Communities In Schools currently has over 90 children on their waiting list, who needs a mentor. If you are interested in being a friend to a needy child, or want more information about the volunteer training sessions, please call the CIS office at 651-7830.

 

Wilkes Central High School is offering a wonderful and lasting souvenir, a Go Eagles! Spirit Afghan, beautiful, top quality, school colors,  to celebrate and remember all the special times at Wilkes Central. A great Christmas gift or any occasion. The cost for each afghan is $40. Send your name, address, phone number, quantity and return order with payment by November 10 to WCHS Academic Boosters, PO Box 176, Moravian Falls, NC 28654. Make checks payable to WCHS Academic Boosters. All proceeds support Academic Booster Club Scholarship Fund.

 

There will be a Bazaar and Yard Sale Saturday, November 11 at 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Denny Grove A.M.E. Zion Church Fellowship Hall on Church Street, Wilkesboro (back of the Tyson plant). Proceeds go to benefit the church.

 

There will be an educational for individual investors at Wilkes Senior Center, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-12 noon, January 2, 9, 16, and 23 (four-week session) taught by Carla Cooksey, sponsored by Edward Jones Investment. To register call 838-1700.

 

A Veterans Day Assembly will be held at North Wilkes High School on November 10 at 12:45 p.m. The assembly will last approximately one hour. All veterans are encouraged to attend this celebration. Veterans, please RSVP with your full name, rank, what branch of service, and dates of service, at 957-8601 as you will be recognized. Students, parents, and grandparents are also invited and asked to RSVP the school. Due to limited seating, please be sure to RSVP.

 

Wing of Wilkes Soccer Association is holding tryouts for one or two (depending on turnout) Male Challenge level soccer teams for the Spring Season (March 3-May 2001). For U15 (players born after 8/1/85) and for U16 (player born after 8/1/84), tryouts will be held at Fairplains School off NC Hwy 18 in North Wilkesboro on Saturday, November 11 at 1:20 p.m. with Registration, Parents Meeting, then tryouts until 3:30 p.m., Sunday, November 12 tryouts -2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Saturday, November 18 tryouts - 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Questions - call Terry Carroll at 667-6611.

 

There will be a revival at Hwy 268 East Bread of Life Church on Thursday, November 9 and Friday, November 10 at 7 p.m. with Bill and Donna Daniels from Kernersville.

 

Closer Walk Worship Center, Ridge Street, Wilkesboro is having revival now through November 10 at 7:30 nightly with Marilyn Griffin from Bennettsville, SC. For more information call 984-3028.

 

Grace Baptist Church of Windy Gap, North Wilkesboro is having a Jubilee now through November 10 at 7:30 nightly. Prayer room is 15 minutes prior to service. Evangelist Bro. Craig Edwards will speak. There will be special singing nightly. Pastor Clyde Holleman and congregation invite everyone to attend.

 

Child Abuse Prevention Team Coat Drive—Lightly used or outgrown coats of all sizes. If your children need a coat, please come by Worth Tomlinson Park (Fair Grounds) November 9 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

 

There will be a special singing Sunday, November 12 at 6 p.m. at Gospel Tabernacle on Fishing Creek Road. Ministering in song will be "From The Heart. Remember-God is Good.

 

Poetry Readings will be held on Tuesday, November 28 at 7 p.m. in the Friends of the Library Meeting Room. Turnout for the Poetry Readings has been very good, averaging about 12 people per month. If you are interested in original poetry, or would like to read a favorite poem, then please come by for an hour of poetry.

 

Moravian Falls Baptist Church is sponsoring a benefit Pork Barbeque Supper and Bake Sale Friday beginning at 5 p.m. In the Fellowship Hall. Adult plates will be $5 and child plates, $3. Take-out plates will be available. Donations will also be appreciated.

 

Rainbow Center, Inc. presents the Sixth Annual Razzle! Dazzle! Holiday Fashion Show Tuesday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. At the North Wilkesboro Elks Lodge. Tickets include dinner and the show, Adults-$25 and Children 12 and under: $10. For mor information call 336-667-3333.

 

There will be a Fall Bazaar at Hinshaw Street Baptist Church November 11 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. In the church parking lot and fellowship hall. Lunch served at 11 a.m. Until 1 p.m. There will be jewelry, crafts, wall hangings, collectibles, baby quilts, Christmas decorations, baskets, baked goods and much more.

 

Brushy Mountain Community Center will hold its annual meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, November 10 at the Brushy Mountain Community Center. Bingo will be played for prizes and refreshments will be served. All Brushy Mountain residents are invited.

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